November 2013 Themes


The following issues were raised during the  discussions of our E-coaching community this month: a) How can a coach, who is new to delivering e-coaching get started? b) The use of art as a way to create powerful connections with e-coaching clients and c) our featured tool this month: CoachAccountable.

  1.      Getting started as an e-coach.

Members of our community offer useful advice to coaches who are new to e-coaching and are looking for an e-coaching platform to get started. Suggestions included the following platforms:

As one member suggested, CoachMaster  is a “user friendly tool, where you have a record and can build a summary of your coaching conversations”.

You can read a short description of the tool  or read the article CoachMaster™ software – the story so far written by Bob Griffiths, which describes the tool in more detail and explains the philosophy behind it. 

Users – members of our community recommend this tool, as  “it’s a user-friendly piece of software that allows you to store all your client data in one place, communicate with clients virtually, create and sell coaching courses and assess your clients.”

You can read a short description of the tool or read the full article “The Power of JournalEngine™: Journaling Meets Coaching” by Kim Ades.

One user´s review of the tool below:

“I use JigsawBox, and have done for a while now. My current approach involves a monthly telephone or Skype session (or f2f if local) and ongoing online coaching in a specially created personal online workspace, working at the client’s pace. My clients find the online work invaluable for keeping their momentum going and for reflecting on issues as they arise. I also use JigsawBox for online self-directed short courses.

This tool can be used to set coaching goals, to develop action plans, to set reminders , use metrics to visualize progress and it allows the entry of notes, coaching assignments and journaling, all of which is shared by both, coach and client. Read the article “Why I Think Coaching can be So Much More: The Reasoning Behind CoachAccountable“, by its creator John Larson.

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Arguably, delivering coaching at a distance however, requires more than an online tool. A useful advice offered by one of our members was that, aside from the undeniable importance of a “safe and secure online coaching program”, delivering e-coaching services requires different skills from those needed in face-to-face coaching, such as for instance, “strong reading and writing skills“. For this reason, it is advisable, according to experts- and members of our community to receive specific e-coach training, in order to get properly trained as an e-coach and develop the skills needed to offer effective coaching at a distance.

paragraph break2. Art and coaching: The use of art as a way to create powerful connections with e-coaching clients

Our member Lisa McLaughlin combines her experiences as a coach and as an artist to develop e-resources for coaches. As an example of her work, Lisa has worked with women entrepreneurs and has created a series of illustrations to accompany the digital exercises of an online course, thereby adding a visual element to e-services, adding an artistic touch  and creating powerful connections with an audience. Read more about her work: http://www.lisamcloughlinart.com/

paragraph break3. CoachAccountable: Featured tool this month

CoachAccountable is an e-coaching tool, developed by John Larson. The purpose of this tool is twofold: Firstly, it supports coaches in organizing, securely storing and having easy access to the information they have about their coaching clients. Secondly, the tool enables asynchronous communication between coach and client through an in-built email system, as well as through a shared repository, consisting of coaching sessions´ plans and notes. CoachAccountable can be used to set coaching goals, to develop action plans, to set reminders and use metrics to visualize progress. Moreover, the tool allows the entry of notes, coaching assignments and journaling, all of which is shared by both, coach and client. John Larson explains the rationale for creating this software in his article “Why I Think Coaching can be So Much More: The Reasoning Behind CoachAccountable”.

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